Statistics in Education (Part 2): When Everything You Ever Wanted Isn’t Enough

I had the most bizarre experience this past weekend. The ever awesome Ellen Yezierski (@EllenYezierski) emailed me an article she uses in her graduate level CER (Chemical Education Research) classes to peruse and discuss. The article details the "new" (i.e. 2018) APA (American Psychological Association) reporting standards that should be used for quantitative research. It … Continue reading Statistics in Education (Part 2): When Everything You Ever Wanted Isn’t Enough

Statistics in Education: It’s harder than it looks

In 2009, when I started thinking about going back to graduate school, statistics was definitely on my mind. I had the perhaps erroneous perception that statistics was not done as well as it could be in educational research, and that perception ate away at my conscience. This is why my original degree plan (pre-reqs started … Continue reading Statistics in Education: It’s harder than it looks

Using Social Media Ethically in the Classroom (ACS Fall National Mtg 2019)

In February 2019, Patricia Mabrouk at Northeastern University contacted me through my web page. The purpose of her inquiry? To participate in a symposium for the ACS Fall 2019 National Meeting entitled "Ethics and Social Media". It was a fascinating topic and I was interested immediately. I gave three options for my potential talk: a reflective … Continue reading Using Social Media Ethically in the Classroom (ACS Fall National Mtg 2019)

Reflections on the Digital Pedagogy Lab (DPL 2019): There will be time

"There will be time, there will be time To prepare a face to meet the faces that you meet; There will be time to murder and create, And time for all the works and days of hands That lift and drop a question on your plate; Time for you and time for me, And time … Continue reading Reflections on the Digital Pedagogy Lab (DPL 2019): There will be time

Ungrading: Transformation in teaching and learning (Part 5)

Ungrading, a term that suggests the opposite of grading, has long been associated with the idea of purposefully eliminating or minimizing the use of points or letters to assess student work. Schinske and Tanner (2014) have provided “evidence that accuracy-based grading may, in fact, demotivate students and impede learning” (Schinske & Tanner, 2014, p. 165). … Continue reading Ungrading: Transformation in teaching and learning (Part 5)

Ungrading: Reframing the Experiment (Part 4)

Once one develops a system for implementing a pedagogical intervention, there's an underlying hope that it will work at least one more time. Cue the crying laughter. I thought once I had figured out the ungrading process, it could be used with every exam. What I forgot was the years of practice I've had simply … Continue reading Ungrading: Reframing the Experiment (Part 4)

5R Adult Learning Assignment 7: Experiential Learning

Synopsis/Reflection – Experiential Learning: Summary, Reflection and Praxis Experiential learning has been the major hallmark of my formal higher education in many ways. From my experience in the 5th grade when I shadowed my sister during her music theory and application classes at Southwestern University to my undergraduate and first graduate degrees in Chemistry to … Continue reading 5R Adult Learning Assignment 7: Experiential Learning

Ungrading: The first exam (Part 3)

There's a major difference between wanting to accomplish something pedagogically and actually implementing it. I forget this important little fact every time I attempt something new. And every time, learning the tacit knowledge needed to implement my vision feels like recreating the wheel. Ungrading was both the same and a different kind of experience than … Continue reading Ungrading: The first exam (Part 3)

5R Adult Learning Assignment 6: Andragogy and Oppressive Pedagogies

Synopsis/Reflection – Andragogy vs. Pedagogy and “Pedagogy of the Oppressed” According to Merriam-Webster, andragogy is the art or science of teaching adults; pedagogy is the art, science, or profession of teaching. Both words derive from the Greek. Pedagogy’s roots - agogus means “leader of” and paid means “child” - combine to form paidagogus, a slave … Continue reading 5R Adult Learning Assignment 6: Andragogy and Oppressive Pedagogies